Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘food & beverage’

From Oriental NC we made our way north, boat-camping our way up.  Although we love the Dismal Swamp Canal, for this run we opted for the more time-efficient Virginia Cut route.  We paused for an afternoon on the Great Bridge Free Dock so that we could make a provisioning run. (We’d provisioned up before leaving Oriental, but the grocery there is a small one, and we missed some things.)  In Chesapeake, we were disappointed to find that the very nice Farm Fresh grocery that was walking distance from the dock is no more; renovations are underway for a Kroger to open in its place.  I do hate to see the Mom & Pop and even regional chains get squeezed out.  Speaking of squeezed, we had some company on the dock, though only one of the boats pictured (the one forward of our Cheshire) actually spent the night.  It’s a bit unusual to see vessels of this size ($$$) on a free dock forgoing power and water.

20180608 Cheshire on the dock, Great Bridge, VA

Cheshire sandwich, Great Bridge Free Dock

We’d hoped to pass through the Portsmouth/Norfolk VA area and head offshore without much delay, but Mother Nature wasn’t having it.  The local weather was lovely, but further north we’d have run into some snotty stuff.  We opted to wait for a better window.  Turns out we had plenty to entertain us while we waited; it was Norfolk HarborFest week-end.  We’d missed the Parade of Sail the previous day, but what a treat to watch a great fireworks show while relaxing on our bow.  Of course we had plenty of company.  Hospital Point is a popular anchorage for cruisers moving north and south, but for this occasion it was jammed with all variety of floating stock.  Mike counted 150 boats. (There were exactly 6 one week later/this afternoon when we departed.)  It was a calm evening or some of these floating messes could have been hazardous in such tight quarters.

Our few days of waiting for weather spilled into a few more days of waiting for mail.  These days we receive very little via snail mail, but when our credit union unexpectedly issued new debit/chip cards, we decided to wait long enough to collect them. Fortunately there is plenty to keep us occupied in the area.  The Portsmouth/Norfolk area has plenty of ginormous vessels… tugs, barges, cargo ships, military vessels, a couple of which are now museums.  We decided to check them out.

We’d seen the Lightship Portsmouth a couple of years back, but with very limited open hours, we didn’t get an opportunity to tour the inside.  This time our timing was better.  Built in 1915, this vessel is over 100 years old, and the docent who gave us our tour isn’t far behind.   Find a bit more history here on the Lighthouse Friends page for this light.

IMG_5355 Lightship Portsmouth

Lightship Portsmouth

 

Elsewhere in Portsmouth, we had a great meal and some interesting local beers at Gosport Tavern, followed by a leisurely stroll around the historic district, very quiet on the Sunday evening we visited.  We were less impressed a few days later with Legend Depot Brewing.  This is a second location for a craft brewer who started in Richmond VA.  To be honest though, the food and beers weren’t bad; our bartender just couldn’t be bothered.

IMG_5358 I've Been Kissed, Portsmouth VA

I’ve Been Kissed!

The real highlight of our stop in the area though was our visit to the USS Wisconsin, a Navy battleship affectionately known as Wisky.  It’s always impressive to cruise through Norfolk, home of the Norfolk Naval Ship Yard where the Navy’s largest vessels are born/built, remodeled and repaired.  How appropriate then that the Wisconsin, said to be one of the largest and last battleships built by the US Navy, came to rest here to serve out the remainder of its life as a museum ship.

It’s been relatively recently that the ship came to be part of Nauticus, a science center and maritime museum.  It’s one of the more accessible military vessels we’ve toured, yet there are huge sections that they haven’t even opened yet to the public.  We enjoyed wandering about on our own, but also sprung for one of the behind the scenes tours, the guided Command and Control tour which just sounded more interesting to us than touring the recently opened Engine Room.  This mighty vessel served during WW2, the Korean War as well as Desert Storm.  (Option to click on the photos below for a larger view.)

IMG_5362 Battleship Wisconsin

big guns, Battleship Wisconsin

After hours aboard the ship, we pedaled about the Ghent neighborhood of Norfolk for some exercise and errands.   Mr Shawarma was a yummy casual Mediteranean place where we grabbed some lunch.  We were also successful in getting Mike’s phone fixed, picked up our mail and wrapped up afternoon sampling some more local brews at O’Connor Brewing Company.  A quick stop at Harris Teater (awsome grocery store we don’t find often enough) and we were back aboard Cheshire.

Today we took care of some chores, including our first attempt at rebuilding a winch.  I’m pleased to say that no parts escaped overboard during this process.  We moved up to the Hampton area where we topped off fuel and made ready for an offshore run we’ll make starting tomorrow.

Stay tuned.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Although we spent most of our pause in Oriental this time through working on boat projects, we did manage to carve out some play time as well.  One of the highlights was a Sunday afternoon spent with land-based friends Mark and Linda who live locally.  We met them a few years back through some mutual cruising friends and later learned that they’re also beekeepers.  It just so happened that the timing of our stop in Oriental coincided with an extraction, and they were kind enough to invite us to help out.  Being the honey fiends that we are, we of course jumped at the opportunity.  One of our habits as we cruise is to seek out local honey, often found at farmers’ markets, but this would be our first experience with seeing the process up close.

When we arrived, cardboard had already been spread over the floor of their breakfast nook and a couple of stacks of boxes from the hives stood ready and waiting on the table.  I’ll apologize in advance for the fact that I probably won’t remember all of the correct terminology.  Although I’m guessing that beekeeping in general can be quite complicated, I was impressed with the simplicity of the extraction process.

Each of the boxes (white in the photos below) contain a dozen or so wooden frames that hang vertically inside each box.  The frame is where the bees make a comb that then houses the honey.  Frames allow combs to be removed for either inspection or extraction without destroying the colony, and once the honey is extracted, the combs are clear and ready for another go round.

We had a slight delay at first when it was discovered that a ball bearing, a critical piece of the cylindrical spinner thing/extractor, was missing.  Fortunately Mike keeps all kinds of spare bits, including in this case the ball bearings from our old auto helm wheel unit. A quick run back to our Cheshire and we were good to go plus had spares, a small price to pay for a sneak peak at the process.

With that sorted out, we got started.  Mark took a serrated knife and a smaller tool to each frame to remove the cappings, the waxy coverings over the comb, to give access to the honey, reserving the cappings/beeswax for another use.

The frames are then dropped two at a time into the extractor.  A crank handle on the top starts the spinning and centrifugal force takes over.  Mike was on crank duty for much of the afternoon.  I took a few turns, but the honey extraction process and photographing same are kind of mutually exclusive activities as you might imagine.

Eventually the honey gets deep enough in the bottom of the tank that it needs drained.  Here it’s double-filtered through stainless steel screens into special 5 gallon buckets with taps near the bottom.  This filtering screens out the miscellaneous bits of wax.

Eventually the honey is tapped into jars… liquid gold.  All told, we extracted about 12 – 13 gallons of honey in just this afternoon.  Of course we had to sample tastes of honey and bits of beeswax throughout the process.  Linda also made some delicious air-fried chicken wings to sustain us through the afternoon, complete with a killer homemade honey-sriracha sauce.  Unfortunately we ate them before I could get a photo.

Although we’d missed the original collection of the boxes, we did get to see Mark suit up to return the frames and boxes to the hives.

 

Many thanks to Mark and Linda for their hospitality, the Beekeeping 101 lesson and a quart jar of really yummy honey.  I now have a source in Oriental.

IMG_5306 Lori & Mark

 

 

Read Full Post »

Having decided to head back to the Florida East Coast, we were once again in familiar waters. We opted for a pause in Bimini Basin/Cape Coral for a few days before ducking back into the Okeechobee Waterway. Fortunate timing let us catch the Cape Coral Farmers Market again; we also hit Publix and a nice little new-to-us Italian grocery, Paesano’s, for some re-provisioning, along with less fun but necessary chores… a trip to the laundromat and an oil change for the Red Queen. Of course we also had to visit a just opened craft brewery we discovered just down from the laundromat.  Big Storm Brewing Co., which was quite good, is apparently also run by folks with a sense of humor… always appreciated.

Our final day in the area was for play; Ohio friends David and Joyce who were spending a month in Naples came up to visit. We had lunch, followed by dessert… my second visit to Ice Screamin  , which is dangerously close to our anchorage.  This little ice cream spot is  another Working Cow distributor… a family-owned company in St Petersburg, FL that make the most amazing handmade ice cream.  I “discovered” them earlier this winter at a little place on the north end of Boca Grande.  Good stuff, but you can only get it in Florida.

 

Saying farewell to Florida’s West Coast, we ducked back into the Okeechobee Canal to once again make our way across the peninsula.  It was a leisurely trip, including a pretty but buggy night on the hook near Moore Haven where the little critters were apparently quite taken by our solar Luci light (photo below); ordinarily over night we only show our top-of-the-mast anchor light, but in creeks frequented by smaller faster boats who aren’t always looking high, we’ll sometimes show an additional low light, in this case our Lucie light.  We also took a layover day at Port St Lucie Lock Marina where we were fortunate to catch the occasional Saturday tour of the lock system.  It’s one of five locks operated by the Army Corps of Engineers along the Okeechobee Waterway.  One more day on the water found us back near Fort Pierce where we were reminded what color water is supposed to be.  The difference between the lake and the cleaner water near Ft Pierce inlet was striking.  I’ve blogged a bit before about the politics of Florida’s water, so I’ll not climb on that soapbox again, though the issue is very much ongoing.

Back on the East Coast, we again took a mooring at Vero Beach, pausing for almost exactly a month this time.  We did a few small boat projects… replaced the carbon monoxide detector, repaired our (secondary) Engel fridge that had gotten a wild hair and decided to stay in freezer mode all of the time, and replace yet another fan that had died.  The primary goal for this stop was to get Mike’s re-injured foot sorted out.  We was able to get an appointment with very good podiatrist who, after an X-ray and exam, declared it to be a “poorly healed fracture”.  Apparently a corrective surgery would have been potentially more damaging than helpful, so she referred him to a pedorthist (there you go, your new word for today) who fit him with a custom orthopedic that fits in a real pair of shoes.  They are a perfectly normal-looking pair of New Balance tennis shoes, but… shoes… not flip-flops or Keens; Mike has taken to referring to them as his Frankenstein shoes.

To take the edge off of all of the above, we also made a visit to another new-to-us craft brewery, Walking Tree Brewery.  It’s off the beaten path in Vero, but not so far from where we were pedaling for these appointments.  Their beers were quite good, but I was particularly captivated by their logo.  Florida mangroves are nicknamed “walking trees”, thriving at waters edge, one foot on land, one foot in the water.  I was also quite taken by a piece of original artwork at the brewery, depicting a terrestrial and watery yin/yang.

LS_20180426_074949 Fort MatanzasHaving resolved Mike’s foot issue to the extent that it can be resolved, we pushed on to St Augustine. It’s been our habit to pause here for a bit on both our southbound and our northbound runs, but it’s always especially a treat to spend the week of my birthday in this beautiful old city. This year was no different. Actually I share my birthday week with several of our St Augustine friends, so it was a bit of a rolling celebration.  Before arriving in St Augustine though, we paused for a night at one of our favorite nearby anchorages, complete with a view of Fort Matanzas.

It was a jam-packed week, catching up with cruising friends locally, crossing paths with friends from elsewhere who just happened to be passing through while we were here, and meeting some new folks who we hope to cross paths with again later this summer. We revisited all four local craft breweries and are happy to report that all are going strong; in fact one has recently added a rotation of food trucks. There were several visits to the Hyppo for gourmet popsicles, including my free birthday pop; Blood Orange Cheesecake has officially made my list of favorites. A new find this stop was a recently opened bakery, Bakersville Bread Company. It’s a bit off the beaten path, but worth seeking out. Here’s hoping they make a go of it.

One of the best parts of being in town for my birthday week is the opportunity to attend the annual Gamble Rogers Music Festival, now it its 23rd year. The festival runs all weekend and features a wide array of regional and local performers. As usual, we caught a few of our favorites and were introduced to some new stuff.

DG 2018 05 Gamble Rogers Festival

crew of BuBu3, LaLuna and Cheshire, Gamble Rogers Festival, 2018

As much as we love St Augustine, we have our sights set on getting a bit further north this coming season. It’s been about 18 months since Cheshire and her crew have been north of the Florida/Georgia line, so we’re looking forward to getting into some higher latitudes. We’ll head north, hope for some cooperative weather for an outside run or two. Next pause: Oriental, NC. Destinations beyond that tbd.

JB 2018 0507 Cheshire departing St Augustine

Cheshire departing St Augustine, photo credit: Jennifer Barringer

Read Full Post »

As much as we love St Augustine, as the temperatures started to drop, we knew it was time to go.  It took us three days to motor from St Augustine to Vero Beach, thanks in part  to some favorable currents, at which point we decided it was warm enough to pause for a few days… which turned into nearly three weeks.  Yep, that’s how we roll.

We arrived a week ahead of Christmas and decided to stick around for the holiday potluck.  It was our first Christmas dinner served buffet style in a laundry room, no joke. Washers (mains and sides) on one side, dryers (apps and desserts) on the other.  Unlike our Thanksgiving potluck of the previous month, the weather was quite cooperative and a good time was had by all.

KL 26047037_1996776693672230_1738670633594429960_nA few days later, some former co-workers of Mike’s came to visit, and unfortunately brought some cooler weather with them.  Nevertheless, we managed to show them some of our favorite Vero spots.  The Indian River Citrus Museum never disappoints… solid Florida kitsch and some interesting history of the Florida citrus industry.

Of course a return visit to McKee Botanical Garden was in order.  They were gearing up for a lighted holiday event later in the evening which we didn’t stick around for, but a special exhibit entitled “It’s a Jungle Out There” featuring the sculptures of a collection of artists in Nairobi, Kenya was particularly captivating.  I quote from their brochure…

“Using reclaimed materials discarded from the car industry and other sources, a group of 19 African artists, ranging in age from 22 to 42 years old, created this collection for McKee.  Head artist Moses Ochieng is committed to training young artists and giving them a lifelong creative skill.  The artists are recruited from disadvantaged, impoverished backgrounds, providing them with employment and apprenticeships to empower them to be self-sustaining, productive members of their communities.  As paid apprentices, these young artists are taught valuable skills such as design, metal cutting, welding, painting and molding.  Most of the artists come from the Luo community and are known for their metal works, while a few are from the Kamba community known for their carving skills.”

I’d (mistakenly) opted not to bring my good camera, so the following  (numerous) shots are taken with my i-phone.

Elsewhere in the garden, we found mistletoe and pink flamingos in their holiday finery.

LS_20171229_144525 Orchard Island Brewery, Vero Beach FLAfter wandering the garden, we took a break beachside at Orchid Island Brewery which was much better than Mike and I recalled from a previous scouting visit… where we enjoyed some tasty bites and drinkable beers.  Later we headed back into town (taking advantage of friends with cars) for dinner at the ever so trendy Southern Social which was as good as we remembered it being from a previous visit.

While we’d hoped to visit the beachside Farmers Market the following morning, the weather was definitely not cooperative.  It was perfect however for a wander through the always impressive Vero Beach Museum of Art.  Not by accident, we caught the final day of a special exhibition, a Maurice Sendak Memorial Exhibition which was quite nice and very kid-friendly, even for grown-up kids.

I was captivated by another piece in the museum’s permanent collection that I’d somehow missed (or perhaps not adequately appreciated) at our previous visits, composed completely from wooden chopsticks and plastic forks.  The artist is Columbian, Federico Uribe, and this piece is titled Oriente-Poniente, which translates “east-west”.

The blue skies cooperated for yet another photo of a perennial favorite in the sculpture garden, a piece titled “Yorkshire Soul 3” by Spanish sculptor, Jaume Plensa.

LS_20171230_121659 Yorkshire Soul III, Jaume Plensa, artist

We spent a good part of the afternoon checking out a new-to-us spot called The Crab Stop which was quite yummy, followed by a bit more visiting back aboard our Cheshire.

LS_20171230_135617 garlic crabs, Crab Stop

Visitors gone, Mike and I tucked in for a quiet New Years Eve which involved dinner, a shared bottle of Prosecco and an early bedtime.  It was a far cry from the NYE parties we hosted in our previous life, but it suits our current lifestyle quite nicely.

And then there was weather…

Read Full Post »

Road-trip 2017, Days 25 – 26

Many moons ago, Mike and I used to be regular visitors to New Orleans, LA.  Our general travel philosophy didn’t allow much for repeat visits to any one place, what with so many new-to-us options, but NOLA was different.  We’d return every 2-3 years for stretch.  Then Hurricane Katrina whacked this fine city in the fall of 2005.  We’d not been back since.

For all of our visits though, we’d never ventured out to Avery Island, home of the famous Tabasco Hot Sauce.  This trip, we decided it was worth a bit of a detour.  Beyond the spacious country store where one can purchase all things pepper sauced, we took the self-guided tour of the factory.  Despite signs warning of bears, we saw no wildlife in the vicinity of the factory.

Adjacent to the world famous Tabasco facility is the lesser known Jungle Gardens of Avery Island where Edward McIlhenny helped to save the snowy egret from extinction.  In the late 1800’s when the snowy egret was being hunted to near extinction for its plumage, he built an aviary on the island.  He would capture and raise these wild egrets, and after they raised their hatchlings, he’d release them in time for migration.  They apparently returned the following spring and every year thereafter, bringing some of their friends along as well.  The garden also features lots of gorgeous live oak trees, a sunken garden, several stands of bamboo and even a Buddha.  And of course there are alligators.  It’s a bit kitchy, but was worth wandering though.

 

From Avery Island we headed to Houma, LA which is nowhere really, but put us striking distance from NOLA.  Pizza at Redfish Pizza was quite good. The following morning we drove into the city.  Breakfast at Cafe DuMonde was of course obligatory.  After meandering the historic district for a while, we encountered long lines/waits at a couple of our favorite spots, settled on a new-to-us place that ended up being nasty.  Who knew you could get bad food in NOLA?

At the end of the day, we decided that as much as we love this city, it’s not at all the same on a day trip.  Or maybe it was the shock of city after several days in the back country.  Either way, next time we’ll plan better.  But for now, we needed to be making tracks.  We drove on to an uneventful night just outside of Mobile, AL with a plan to explore the Pensacola area of the FL panhandle the following day.

Read Full Post »

Road-trip 2017 Day 10

After a serviceable breakfast at the very retro Courtesy Coffee Shop (Lounge by night) in Blythe, CA, we headed on for a last bit of the wild before finishing up our drive into Los Angeles.  Joshua Tree started its life as a National Monument (proclaimed so by FDR in 1936) and was renamed/redesignated  Joshua Tree National Park in 1994, and protects 792,510 acres of mostly wilderness where the Mojave and Colorado deserts converge.  It proved to be a fine place to stretch our legs a bit.

We started our explorations in the southeastern part of the the park, part of the Colorado Desert, with elevations of less than 3,000 ft above sea level.  From near the Cottonwood Springs Visitors Center, we opted for the Mastodon Peak trail which did not disappoint.  Desert wildflowers and cacti blooms were abundant, although the intense sun of late morning made for some challenging photography. (ID help welcome!)

A few lizards also captured my attention.

 

As we made our way north and west in the park, we passed through what is referred to as a transition zone entered the Mojave Desert with elevations above 3,00 ft.  We stopped along the way for some shorter hikes.  It was at these elevations that we found expanses of the the park’s namesake, the Joshua Trees.  Tough and curious things, they’re not trees at all, rather belong to the yucca or agave family.  They have spiky succulent leaves that are kind of bayonet-shaped and every bit as sharp.

Of course in reading about the Joshua tree, I couldn’t help but stumble over references to the 1982 U2 album of the same name.  This Irish rock band was quite captivated with the deserts of the American southwest and found the landscapes to be quite fitting with the theme/songs of the album.  The cover photo however was not taken in Joshua Tree National Park, rather at another location in the Mojave Desert some 200 miles away.  While the actual tree fell some time ago, there is reportedly a plaque placed for those who go searching.

LS_20170405_171212 road snacks, Mexican-style

We left the park in the late afternoon with a plan to be at Duncan and Daniela’s place in LA for a late dinner.  A search for a milkshake or some such thing took us to a brightly lit place called La Michoacana in Beaumont CA where we picked up a couple of mangonadas, a kind of sweet, spicy, party-colored Mexican fruit drink with tamarind-coated straws.  Not bad really.   In any event, they quenched our thirst and tided us over to LA.

Read Full Post »

We were in St Augustine when we learned that several of our dirt-dwelling friends from Ohio would be visiting the central Florida area this winter.  As we had no other definite plans, we decided a return visit to Vero Beach was in order.  This would be our third visit to Vero, and as it turned out, also our longest.

One weekend we rented a car and headed inland to catch up with some friends Bob & Donna and Dave & Teresa who were camping in Kissimmee State Park.  We enjoyed some hikes, some shared meals, and comparing notes on living in our respective small spaces, their tow-behind campers vs our Cheshire.  32143751324_55a5583d30_o

Meanwhile back in Vero, we were once again successful in clearing out the guest cabin to accommodate overnight guests aboard.  Mark & Pam were in the area for a short stretch.  It seems they always visit when we’re on a mooring ball/away from the dock, so they had the full dinghy back-and-forth experience to boot.  They were the first brave souls, not counting Mike himself, to test out the newly fashioned sling seat that hangs off our transom.  Depending on the time of day, our ginormous solar panels even offer a bit of shade.

We made a drive down to Ft Pierce to check out the Navy SEAL Museum which was well worth the trip.  The boys especially enjoyed the training “playground”.

Interestingly it was on the nearby beaches that those who preceded the SEALs would train for  their assault on the beaches of Normandy and Southern France in Europe and numerous islands throughout the Pacific.  We found it to be a much more peaceful place today; the terns seemed to agree.

Back in Vero Beach, we made a return visit (1st for Mark & Pam) to McKee Botanical Garden.  In addition to the usual plants and sculptures, they had a couple of special exhibitions.  The “Nature Connects: Art with Lego Bricks” exhibit was something we had seen before at a garden in Naples FL a few years back.  It’s almost impossible to appreciate these pieces via photos, but I’ve included a few below anyway.  Patrick Dougherty’s Stickwork was also a familiar sight, as I’d watch him construct a few of these pieces on the grounds at the Franklin Park Conservatory in Columbus OH a number of years ago.  The link above is to the Garden’s write up on the exhibit, and includes some additional photos and an interesting description of the process.

 

Former cruising friends/currently CLODs (Cruisers Living On Dirt) Stew & Diana drove up from Stuart for a visit one day, and we were pleased to find a few other cruising friends wintering in Vero Beach as well.  The weekly Thursday Happy Hour gathering continues and was good for meeting some new folk.  On a couple of Mondays we joined the group that frequents Mr Manatee’s for $5 Burger night.  Mike bravely tackled the Colossal Woodrow Burger (a double stacked (a full pound)/pork roll/bacon egg/onion rings/mozzarella sticks) challenge,,, eat the whole thing, including the fries, and get a free t-shirt.  One guy in the group does the challenge weekly;  apparently everyone he knows now has a t-shirt.

The remainder of our time was spent revisiting familiar places… the Vero Beach Museum of Art never disappoints.  Larry Kagan’s Object/Shadow exhibit was amazing.  (See Che Guevara image below and check out the link above for more info.)  Deborah Butterfield’s Horses were also breathtaking.  We were frequent visitors to the Saturday Farmers’ Market Oceanside, often walking over early for coffee and a bite of breakfast on the beach before doing our shopping.  We also dug a little deeper and found some new things.  Taking advantage of the free/donation bus service, we found some new hiking spots, a couple of new-to-us restaurants and a fish/seafood market that had just opened at our last visit, now doing quite well (see carry out stone crabs pictured below… quite yummy).  Our stay also overlapped with the Vero Beach Art Club’s Under the Oaks Fine Arts and Crafts show which was nicely done; we were tempted by a couple of pieces, but alas, we have little remaining room for art.  All in all, it was a fine stay.

Vero Beach is definitely one of our favorite stops along Florida’s east coast.  As usual, our month long stay stretched a bit longer… no surprise.  For now though, we’ll head back north.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: