Archive for the ‘US Atlantic Coast’ Category

Just before New Years Eve, our visitors left and we tucked in to avoid what was to be a couple of days of rain.  In fact it rained very little, but enough that I was able to run around topsides with a deck brush and knock most of the worst of the crud loose to be rinsed off.

Then it got cold.  Really cold.  At least for central Florida, really cold.  We thought we were ahead of it leaving St Augustine a few weeks back, but we were mistaken.  To be fair, we got nothing near what friends and family further north have gotten.  That said, cold on an uninsulated boat away from the luxury of shore power (translate: heat) is different than the cold you come in from and sit by a fire.

And what the heck is a “bomb cyclone” anyway?  I also must have missed the memo that informed that we’re now naming winter storms… Winter Storm Grayson?  Really?  In any event, as long as my fingers hold out typing in the cold, I thought I’d capture a few thoughts.

As I mentioned above, when we’re away from a dock, as is our current situation bobbing around on a mooring ball, we have no source of heat.  I’ve been inspired to make friends with our oven.  Mostly we use the 2-burner stovetop, a small broiler and our outside propane grill of course.  Rarely have we used the oven.  It’s small (think oversized shoebox), the heat is uneven, and until our fridge replacement a couple of years back, we were propane misers.  In recent weeks I’ve made several different batches of muffins (6 at a time because that’s what fits), a few loaves of cranberry-orange nut bread (a holiday favorite), an apple cake, and even a gingerbread cake for the Christmas holiday.  So, on the upside, we’re eating well.

But it’s cold.  We’re wearing way more clothes than we’re accustomed to, even socks (gasp!).  The Captain has taken to wearing a hat during the day as well as at night.  We’ve had a couple of nights in a row where overnight lows have gotten into the 30’s outside, which translates to mid 40’s inside, yes INSIDE!  We stay fairly cozy under three fleece blankets while sleeping, but then we have to get up.

I have fond memories (not) of winter mornings in Ohio where I had to scrape ice and snow off of my car before I could even think about going to work.  I decided this morning that my current day equivalent is getting up and having to take a shammy to the windows, walls and ceilings of my boat/home to wipe up the dripping water that’s formed due to condensation… yes, we breathe overnight.  It’s been a couple of days now since the inside temp has gotten above 60°F even during the day.

Dinghy rides into a cold wind are also aren’t fun, but at least the dinghy doesn’t slip and slide as a car does on ice.

I’ve also learned that if you park your coffee mugs along the back of the stove while you’re warming the kettle, they warm a bit.  Ditto for bowls that will eventually hold our oatmeal.

We shall survive.  We shall also keep moving south.  We’ve braved the cold the last couple of days to make a provisioning run, top off water tanks and do laundry. The forecast is for some warming, but even so, tomorrow we cast off the mooring lines and head on south.  Destinations tbd.  Socks optional.





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As much as we love St Augustine, as the temperatures started to drop, we knew it was time to go.  It took us three days to motor from St Augustine to Vero Beach, thanks in part  to some favorable currents, at which point we decided it was warm enough to pause for a few days… which turned into nearly three weeks.  Yep, that’s how we roll.

We arrived a week ahead of Christmas and decided to stick around for the holiday potluck.  It was our first Christmas dinner served buffet style in a laundry room, no joke. Washers (mains and sides) on one side, dryers (apps and desserts) on the other.  Unlike our Thanksgiving potluck of the previous month, the weather was quite cooperative and a good time was had by all.

KL 26047037_1996776693672230_1738670633594429960_nA few days later, some former co-workers of Mike’s came to visit, and unfortunately brought some cooler weather with them.  Nevertheless, we managed to show them some of our favorite Vero spots.  The Indian River Citrus Museum never disappoints… solid Florida kitsch and some interesting history of the Florida citrus industry.

Of course a return visit to McKee Botanical Garden was in order.  They were gearing up for a lighted holiday event later in the evening which we didn’t stick around for, but a special exhibit entitled “It’s a Jungle Out There” featuring the sculptures of a collection of artists in Nairobi, Kenya was particularly captivating.  I quote from their brochure…

“Using reclaimed materials discarded from the car industry and other sources, a group of 19 African artists, ranging in age from 22 to 42 years old, created this collection for McKee.  Head artist Moses Ochieng is committed to training young artists and giving them a lifelong creative skill.  The artists are recruited from disadvantaged, impoverished backgrounds, providing them with employment and apprenticeships to empower them to be self-sustaining, productive members of their communities.  As paid apprentices, these young artists are taught valuable skills such as design, metal cutting, welding, painting and molding.  Most of the artists come from the Luo community and are known for their metal works, while a few are from the Kamba community known for their carving skills.”

I’d (mistakenly) opted not to bring my good camera, so the following  (numerous) shots are taken with my i-phone.

Elsewhere in the garden, we found mistletoe and pink flamingos in their holiday finery.

LS_20171229_144525 Orchard Island Brewery, Vero Beach FLAfter wandering the garden, we took a break beachside at Orchid Island Brewery which was much better than Mike and I recalled from a previous scouting visit… where we enjoyed some tasty bites and drinkable beers.  Later we headed back into town (taking advantage of friends with cars) for dinner at the ever so trendy Southern Social which was as good as we remembered it being from a previous visit.

While we’d hoped to visit the beachside Farmers Market the following morning, the weather was definitely not cooperative.  It was perfect however for a wander through the always impressive Vero Beach Museum of Art.  Not by accident, we caught the final day of a special exhibition, a Maurice Sendak Memorial Exhibition which was quite nice and very kid-friendly, even for grown-up kids.

I was captivated by another piece in the museum’s permanent collection that I’d somehow missed (or perhaps not adequately appreciated) at our previous visits, composed completely from wooden chopsticks and plastic forks.  The artist is Columbian, Federico Uribe, and this piece is titled Oriente-Poniente, which translates “east-west”.

The blue skies cooperated for yet another photo of a perennial favorite in the sculpture garden, a piece titled “Yorkshire Soul 3” by Spanish sculptor, Jaume Plensa.

LS_20171230_121659 Yorkshire Soul III, Jaume Plensa, artist

We spent a good part of the afternoon checking out a new-to-us spot called The Crab Stop which was quite yummy, followed by a bit more visiting back aboard our Cheshire.

LS_20171230_135617 garlic crabs, Crab Stop

Visitors gone, Mike and I tucked in for a quiet New Years Eve which involved dinner, a shared bottle of Prosecco and an early bedtime.  It was a far cry from the NYE parties we hosted in our previous life, but it suits our current lifestyle quite nicely.

And then there was weather…

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Hurricane Irma…   This is probably the most difficult blog post I’ve tried to write.  For more than a week now, I’ve been trying to find words and without fail, I come up short. While Texas was still cleaning up from Hurricane Harvey’s visit and with wildfires burning all over California and the Pacific Northwest, a storm that would come to be named Irma started its long trek in our direction.  In the end, we were so fortunate.  Many of our friends, acquaintances and others we’ve never met were not.  Having lived this cruising life for more than 6 years now, we have friends and acquaintances scattered about all over the place, from Maine to the Florida Keys and beyond to the islands of the Bahamas and the Caribbean.  When a monster storm like Irma or Harvey, or Matthew of last season appear, our concern is not only for own safety and that of our Cheshire, but for so many others who are suddenly in harm’s way.

I can’t even begin to summarize the disaster Irma has created, in fact I won’t even try.  Anyone who was watching it unfold on TV has seen the devastation.  So many of the places we’ve visited in years past are just wrecked, many of them before even completely recovering from previous storms.  St Mary’s GA got smacked, and our beloved St Augustine took another hard hit as well.  It seems only the panhandle of Florida was spared.  It’s all so overwhelming, but I think we are most heartbroken by the impact on the Florida Keys.   It’s beyond description really.  We’ve spent two winter seasons in the amazing community that is Boot Key Harbor and in fact had planned to return for at least part of the season this year.  I can’t even begin to fathom how long their recovery will take.  While the mainstream media has moved on, the recovery efforts across the state and elsewhere in the Bahamas and Caribbean are just beginning and will no doubt take years to complete.  Some places will likely never fully recover.

Irma was a monster storm right out of the gate, one that maintained hurricane status for 11 days.  She formed early and far to the west and left a wide path of destruction in her wake.  Closer to home, she brought epic levels of storm surge to Jacksonville FL resulting in flood levels not seen since the mid 1800’s.

While it pales in comparison to what many have experienced,  I’ll try to capture a bit of our personal experience with Irma.  It truly feels small and insignificant in the big picture, but because this blog is intended to capture bits of our own cruising life, I’ll give it a shot.

On Wednesday August 30, with the National Hurricane Center 11am update, Irma was declared a tropical storm.  We were already starting preparations to be away for nearly a week, and began considering some extra storm prep as well.  By 11am the following day (Thurs), Irma had been upgraded to hurricane status, and by 5pm that evening, was a Category 3 hurricane.  This was a pretty rapid development, as most hurricanes wander a bit as lower intensity storms. We opted to take down our whole boat sun shades (which catch a lot of wind) and the jib as part of our prep.

We left bright and early Sat morning, Sept 2, for our drive to the mountains of North Carolina.  We had a lovely time catching up with friends from OH, day-hiking the Blue Ridge Mountains outside of Asheville.  (Blog post on the NC trip to follow.)  Irma meanwhile continued to make her way across the  Atlantic, with periodic fluctuations in intensity.  It’s an understatment to say that we were closely monitoring her progress.

By Sunday evening, hurricane watches began to be issued for Leeward Islands.  By Monday late morning, those watches were upgraded to warnings, and watches were issued for the US Virgins, the British Virgins and Puerto Rico. Before midnight, the Virgins and PR would also be upgraded to warning status.  While we were enjoying our morning coffee at daybreak on Tuesday, Irma was upgraded to a Cat 5. By Wednesday morning, almost a full week after she began, Irma started tearing her way over the Leeward Islands, passing north of Puerto Rico later that night.

As originally planned, we left the mountains Thursday morning, and after a nice pause in Columbia, SC to lunch with one of my nieces, finished our drive to north Florida, witnessing an abundance of northbound evacuation traffic.  We arrived at our marina with enough daylight left to do a bit more storm prep… removed the dinghy and secured it ashore and doubled/tripled some docklines. Meanwhile Irma was prompting hurricane warnings in Bahamas, storm surge/hurricane watches for south FL & the Keys while she  pummeled the Turks & Caicos.  The 11pm update would  upgrade watches to warnings for south FL and Keys.

Friday we scurried to finish our storm prep, including removing our solar array (no small task), the blades of our wind generator, and clearing the last of covers and loose items from our hatches and the cockpit.  We opted to disconnect from shore power and set switches so that only the bilge pumps were juiced as we were now on battery  power (with no charging from solar or wind) only for the foreseeable future.  The last thing we did was tape bits of tarp over the helm, as well as the cockpit windows and door, having learned from previous experience that even beneath the bimini, they are prone to leaking in horizontal hurricane-driven rain.  Having done all we could do, we opted to evacuate ourselves, hoping our evening-into-nighttime drive would spare us some of the evacuation traffic jams.  (Jacksonville was set to issue evacuation orders for our area anyway, though many stayed behind… boats float after all).  As we arrived in Panama City Beach where we’d hide out at Mom’s previously empty condo, Irma was making landfall in Cuba, and was now forecasted to take a more westerly track… we swore she was following us to the panhandle.

LS_20170908_155053 finishing storm prep

Saturday morning, Sept 9th began my obsessive monitoring of TV/social media storm coverage.  By 11pm Irma was still meandering along the north coast of Cuba, setting sights on the FL Keys and west coast of FL.  Hurricane warnings were in effect from Fernandina Beach around the entire Florida peninsula to Indian Pass, just 62 miles east of PCB, the whole Florida coastline save about 150 miles of the panhandle,  plus the Florida Keys, Lake Okeechobee, Florida Bay, parts of Cuba and Bahamas.  The satellite views and radar around this time were telling.


Irma next made landfall on Sunday morning, Sept 10, shortly after 9am as a Cat 4 on Cudjoe Key, between Key West and Marathon, but her path was wide.  By mid afternoon she’d moved on to another landfall (Cat 3) near Marco Island.  The flooding in the Marco Island/Naples area was significant.

Come Monday morning, Sept 11, the 8am update downgraded Irma to a mere tropical storm as she moved along the northwest coast, across the state and north into GA.  This is when things started getting exciting in Jacksonville.  Storm driven water being pushed into the mouth of the St Johns River met the outflow of the river, swollen from rain, resulting in epic storm surge and flooding in Jacksonville at levels not seen since the mid 1800’s. Thankfully a couple of friends who had either stayed aboard at our marina, or returned after the hurricane threat had passed, kept us posted as the water rose with the afternoon high tide. Apparently our marina was not at risk, but the next marina up river  came  uncomfortably close to having their floating docks float over the top of their lower-than-ours pilings, or so our fellow dock mates were warned by the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office who were monitoring happenings along the waterfront.  To my knowledge only one boat in our marina sustained damage, when a poorly anchored boat drug and ended up broadside across a couple of others on A-dock.  Some cars however didn’t fare as well; the high water came fast and was a bit of a surprise, and those busy prepping boats didn’t think to move their vehicles.

Pictures tell the story better.  Many thanks to dock mates, including Kareena of s/v Valhalla and Maryam of s/v Colorado for most of the high water photos.  I tried to duplicate the shots later as the water receded, but the elevation change and high sun made it challenging.  Still, I think you can get a feel for it.  Check out the piling heights relative to things that don’t float, the ramp angles, etc.

From D-dock (ours):

From C-dock, on the way to the clubhouse:

Around the clubhouse, pool and grounds:

Elsewhere in Jacksonville, the Life sculpture at Memorial Park illustrates well.  The shot with wave action was from a local newspaper article.  The one below it is mine from a visit to the park earlier this summer.  At right is the parking lot of a long-closed department store in the complex with our local Publix; note the kayaker (another shot from the local paper).  Even as I write, the water is still receding about town and some are still without power.  As noted before though, there are so many others who are dealing with so much more destruction.  Again, we count ourselves as fortunate once again, but hurricane season is not over.  Even as I type, there are three more storms brewing in the Atlantic.  Here’s hoping that those who’ve already taken a hit will get a reprieve from storms still to come.


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OK, so it’s been a pause of epic proportions… more than 4 months in duration if I’m being honest.  In the last few days, I’ve had two different friends/readers check in to see if we are OK, having not seen a post in a great while.  Mike would tell you I’ve been talking about needing to get caught up, and indeed, there is a lot to catch up on.  I’m considering myself nudged.  Note that I’ll be backdating posts to come to maintain some sense of chronology.

Since I left off blogging in early February in St Augustine, we’ve been…

… south to the Vero Beach area where we hung out on a mooring for awhile, caught up with some cruising friends and met some new folks, as well as hooked up with some long-time friends from Ohio, several of whom were camping in the Kissimmee area for a stretch.  How fun it was to compare our boat life with those who’ve recently taken up camping with tow-behind campers…

… then back to St Augustine for another couple of months where I celebrated another birthday as did some friends, made a return visit to both the bird rookery at the Alligator Farm and the Gamble Rogers Music Festival among other things…

…during which time we also rented a car for a month-long road trip from north Florida to Los Angeles and back with many fun stops along the way…

… and we helped some friends move their 51′ Morgan Out Island from St Augustine to Ft Lauderdale, my (Lori’s) first real adventure on a monohull except for occasional day sails, about a 3 1/2 day offshore adventure.

Just ahead of the beginning of June, which is also the beginning of the Atlantic hurricane season, we moved our Cheshire up to a marina off of the St John’s River, not too far from downtown Jacksonville where we’ll hang out through the summer-into-fall.  We’ve been here a couple of times before, but for shorter stays.  This time through, we plan to dig a little deeper.  It’s a comfy protected marina with great amenities including a pool and free laundry, both of which will be handy as we move further into the summer.  I’ve found a local yoga studio and we’ve sorted out the JTA  (Jax’s public transportation system) for when our folding bikes aren’t up for the distance.  We’ve got a running list of places we want to explore and Mike of course has a long list of restaurants he wants to check out.  As always, there will be some routine boat chores/projects, but as of this writing, nothing too heavy duty, and definitely to be scheduled in the early and late parts of the day… it’s already quite warm here.  My mid-day plan is to hide out in the air-conditioning and blog.

Time flies…

Today happens to be the 6-year anniversary of our moving aboard our Cheshire.  Just for fun, I re-read an early post (the text of which I actually sent via e-mail lists before I had this blog up and running)… find it here if you too are interested in the flashback.

We’ve also just sent our passports off to be renewed, reminiscing a bit about the places we’ve been in recent years and options for the years to come… and picked up some “alternate” passports to keep us occupied in the meantime.


Stay tuned, and thanks for checking in.








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I’ve lost count of how many times we’ve transited the ICW in north central FL.  We’ve made some outside runs off shore along this stretch as well, but often we’ve been inside.  The bridges are familiar to us.  The landmarks are familiar to us.  Occasionally we’ve stopped along the way… Cocoa, New Smyrna Beach, and a couple of stays in the Merritt Island/Canaveral area… but for whatever reason, although we’ve anchored nearby often, we’d never gone ashore at Daytona Beach.  Worse yet, although we’ve seen it numerous times from the water, we’d never managed to stop and visit the lighthouse at Ponce Inlet.  For this trip north, I vowed to remedy this.

We arrived in Daytona mid-day on Sunday, and after getting settled in a new-to-us anchorage, we went ashore on the Daytona Beach side of the river to find a bite to eat and scout the bus stop we’d need for the following day’s adventure to Ponce Inlet.  On  a tip from former cruising friends, we went in search of the Daytona Taproom; we were not disappointed. Great burgers, fries and plenty of local beer options.

After a lunch that was much more substantial than our usual, a long walk was in order.  We opted to make a big loop, over to the beach side, south to Main, then west on Main toward the Halifax River/ICW, and finally north up to where we’d left the dinghy near the Seabreeze twin bridges.  Little did we know that this route would take us through the heart of the tail end of Daytona Bike Week.  Despite our having motorcycled for years, we’d never seen this event in person… wow, just wow.  I couldn’t even begin to try and photograph it for fear of tripping off the curb in the crowds.

The following morning we were back ashore for breakfast before catching our bus.  The mass exodus was underway, with bikes on trailers everywhere and the monumental clean-up effort underway.  We caught our bus and settled in for the 10 mile ride south.

LS_20170320_095310 sunrise over condos, Daytona Beach FL

sunrise over condos, Daytona Beach

From the water, we hadn’t appreciated the size of the park grounds at Ponce Inlet, officially known as the Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse and Museum.  An impressive stand of live oaks on grounds were home to a number of Red-bellied Woodpeckers.  A couple of them were even cooperative with my efforts to photograph them.  There was also a collection of Cuban Refugee Rafts;  we’d seen such exhibits before, particularly in the Florida Keys, but they always manage to make me catch my breath.


Standing at 175 feet, Ponce Inlet Light is said to be the tallest lighthouse in Florida and the second tallest masonry lighthouse in the country. (Cape Hatteras on NC’s Outer Banks takes first prize in this category.)  Like many other lighthouses we have visited, the various keepers’ cottages and auxiliary buildings now serve as museum space.  Ponce also is known for their lens restoration, and in fact have a dedicated building, the Ayers Davies Lens Exhibit Building, which houses an impressive collection of restored Fresnel lenses.

The Lighthouse Friends page for Ponce de Leon Inlet Light provides some interesting history, including a bit about author Stephen Crane’s real life adventure.   He was shipwrecked during a gale off the Florida coast while enroute to Cuba, and tells of this adventure in his short story titled The Open Boat.  Curiously, this light was previously known as Mosquito Light, until it was decided in the mid-1920’s that the name itself was not helping to encourage settlement in the area.  Of course we had to make the climb, all 203 steps, and were rewarded with a nice view of the inlet.

After our climb, we took a stroll out to the water.  I was saddened to find a Cormorant with a fishing hook caught in its bill… an all too common occurrence really.  Birds get hooked and/or entangled either in discarded line and tackle, or often get snagged when they try to steal a fish that’s already been hooked.

We caught our bus back north, found our dinghy and Cheshire right where we’d left them, and deemed Ponce Inlet Light well worth the pause.


Mike at the bus stop


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We were in St Augustine when we learned that several of our dirt-dwelling friends from Ohio would be visiting the central Florida area this winter.  As we had no other definite plans, we decided a return visit to Vero Beach was in order.  This would be our third visit to Vero, and as it turned out, also our longest.

One weekend we rented a car and headed inland to catch up with some friends Bob & Donna and Dave & Teresa who were camping in Kissimmee State Park.  We enjoyed some hikes, some shared meals, and comparing notes on living in our respective small spaces, their tow-behind campers vs our Cheshire.  32143751324_55a5583d30_o

Meanwhile back in Vero, we were once again successful in clearing out the guest cabin to accommodate overnight guests aboard.  Mark & Pam were in the area for a short stretch.  It seems they always visit when we’re on a mooring ball/away from the dock, so they had the full dinghy back-and-forth experience to boot.  They were the first brave souls, not counting Mike himself, to test out the newly fashioned sling seat that hangs off our transom.  Depending on the time of day, our ginormous solar panels even offer a bit of shade.

We made a drive down to Ft Pierce to check out the Navy SEAL Museum which was well worth the trip.  The boys especially enjoyed the training “playground”.

Interestingly it was on the nearby beaches that those who preceded the SEALs would train for  their assault on the beaches of Normandy and Southern France in Europe and numerous islands throughout the Pacific.  We found it to be a much more peaceful place today; the terns seemed to agree.

Back in Vero Beach, we made a return visit (1st for Mark & Pam) to McKee Botanical Garden.  In addition to the usual plants and sculptures, they had a couple of special exhibitions.  The “Nature Connects: Art with Lego Bricks” exhibit was something we had seen before at a garden in Naples FL a few years back.  It’s almost impossible to appreciate these pieces via photos, but I’ve included a few below anyway.  Patrick Dougherty’s Stickwork was also a familiar sight, as I’d watch him construct a few of these pieces on the grounds at the Franklin Park Conservatory in Columbus OH a number of years ago.  The link above is to the Garden’s write up on the exhibit, and includes some additional photos and an interesting description of the process.


Former cruising friends/currently CLODs (Cruisers Living On Dirt) Stew & Diana drove up from Stuart for a visit one day, and we were pleased to find a few other cruising friends wintering in Vero Beach as well.  The weekly Thursday Happy Hour gathering continues and was good for meeting some new folk.  On a couple of Mondays we joined the group that frequents Mr Manatee’s for $5 Burger night.  Mike bravely tackled the Colossal Woodrow Burger (a double stacked (a full pound)/pork roll/bacon egg/onion rings/mozzarella sticks) challenge,,, eat the whole thing, including the fries, and get a free t-shirt.  One guy in the group does the challenge weekly;  apparently everyone he knows now has a t-shirt.

The remainder of our time was spent revisiting familiar places… the Vero Beach Museum of Art never disappoints.  Larry Kagan’s Object/Shadow exhibit was amazing.  (See Che Guevara image below and check out the link above for more info.)  Deborah Butterfield’s Horses were also breathtaking.  We were frequent visitors to the Saturday Farmers’ Market Oceanside, often walking over early for coffee and a bite of breakfast on the beach before doing our shopping.  We also dug a little deeper and found some new things.  Taking advantage of the free/donation bus service, we found some new hiking spots, a couple of new-to-us restaurants and a fish/seafood market that had just opened at our last visit, now doing quite well (see carry out stone crabs pictured below… quite yummy).  Our stay also overlapped with the Vero Beach Art Club’s Under the Oaks Fine Arts and Crafts show which was nicely done; we were tempted by a couple of pieces, but alas, we have little remaining room for art.  All in all, it was a fine stay.

Vero Beach is definitely one of our favorite stops along Florida’s east coast.  As usual, our month long stay stretched a bit longer… no surprise.  For now though, we’ll head back north.


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As I write, we’re wrapping up a six-week long stay in St Augustine.  After our engine drama and yard time in Oriental, NC and a frigid couple of weeks with even more engine drama getting south, we vowed to take a break from projects, rest, relax, and regroup.  We spent the Christmas holiday with Mom in the FL panhandle, and the weeks that followed back in St Augustine catching up with “old” friends, some who are here and some passing though, and making some new friends as well.  We’ve made visits to some of our favorite restaurants in the area, and have explored some new ones that have appeared on the scene since our last pass through.  Digging a bit deeper than the ever present tourists, we joined in a silent march and ceremony in honor of Martin Luther King Jr., as well as the Unity in Community March, a sister march to the Women’s March in DC.  The latter was particularly well attended, with the crowd estimated at about 2,000 strong… not bad for a town this size.  As luck would have it, we also caught a bit of the St Augustine Film Festival.  In between all of the above, we’ve enjoyed, as we always do, the Nights of Lights;  St Augustine does look pretty dressed up in her holiday finery.

I promptly signed up for an unlimited month of classes at the nearby yoga studio that I was introduced to a year or so back.  Several times a week, I take a short pedal from our marina, along the pond at Oyster Creek which offers some great birding, particularly at low tide, through a quiet residential neighborhood to the studio.  It’s been a great habit to step back into.

Along with some  small, routine cleaning and maintenance, I did decided to tackle one of my least favorite cleaning chores.  We have a storage locker at the foot of our master bunk (we refer to it as the foot locker), a wedge shaped space that reaches out under the foredeck.  With virtually no insulation, any kind of temperature fluctuations lead to condensation, and with little to no air circulation, gets pretty funky.  Our cold run south recently had pushed it over the edge of tolerable.  Cleaning it out requires half climbing into the barely-big-enough-to-do-so space.  While I had it emptied and relatively clean, Mike decided to install a 12-volt “muffin” fan between the foot locker and the adjacent hanging locker, in hopes that some improved air circulation will keep the funk down.

Mike also installed an AC/shore power monitor allowing him to geek the AC power numbers the way he does the DC numbers.  Of course the breaker tripping issue that prompted said installation ceased to happen immediately after the monitor was installed. Go figure.

So far we’d stuck to our plan… no big projects, rest, relax, regroup…

Then some local friends announced that they’d be leaving town for a week; we decided it was an opportunity to borrow some project space for the big project we’d been putting off… recovering the settee cushions in the salon.  When we’re inside the boat and not sleeping, we’re in the salon, kind of a combination dining room/living room/office.  It gets a lot of wear and it’s been looking progressively rough.  It’s been 2 1/2 years ago that we ordered new fabric, but at the time were distracted by other more priority projects.  Last winter while in Marathon, we ordered new foam cushions, but then the fridge died unexpectedly and replacing it became the priority.  We stuffed the new foam in the old cushions and threw some towels over the top to cover the holes.  It’s a project that takes some ample clean space, so it went on hold while we cruised up north last summer.  Our friends’ kind offer of their condo presented the perfect opportunity.

Step one was shuttling the cushions, materials and a monster-heavy sewing machine to the condo.  We spent 5 solid days disassembling and reassembling the cushions, 5 in all, 3 different shapes.  The horizontal ones required some complicated sewing.  The first cushion took a whole day and was pretty much a disaster.  Overnight, the Captain came up with a new design, and life got much better.  We recovered 7 cushions in all.  Three were  horizontal ones that took some tricky sewing.  The remaining four vertical ones required removing a gazillion staples from the plywood backing, re-stapling the new fabric, then making and installing a dozen fabric covered buttons.  I’ll just say that Mike continues to fine-tune his sewing skills, our heavy-duty stapler is awesome, and I have a whole new appreciation for covered buttons.

The process:

A before shot… taken during one of our first few days aboard back in 2011.  We were in the process of  emptying lockers and sorting out the junk that came with the boat purchase… patio furniture cushions anyone?


settee, the early days

The following were taken last winter… the holes that prompted us to prioritize the project again, then the stripped down salon without cushions, while stripping/refinishing the back wall.


Here’s what it looked like during the project… cockpit cushions and every other available cushion and pillow on the boat pressed into temporary service.  ls_20170126_185344-settee-during

Finally, the the after photo.  Almost looks like grown-ups live here, doesn’t it?


new cushions installed

We even had a bit of fabric left over, enough to cover the headboard in our master cabin.  Very fancy…


new headboard in master cabin

Many thanks to our friends Dawn & Paul who lent us their space and helped shuttle materials to, and to a fellow yogi Tamara who helped us shuttle it all back to Cheshire.

We’ve now finished our short list of departure chores, and had a few good-bye dinners with friends. Rested and recovered, tomorrow we cast off the dock lines and head a bit further south.  Stay tuned.



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